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CSS Editorial Staff

Hard Hat

Hard Hat

Hard hats are one of the most universally recognizable forms of personal protective equipment and one of the easiest ways to protect workers from permanent and devastating head injuries. Also known as industrial safety helmets, har hats protect the wearer’s heads from object-generated impacts, penetration hazards, electrical shock, and even burn hazards. OSHA mandates the

Bump Cap

Bump Cap

When people think of head protection, hard hats are usually the first thing to come to mind. Construction site and roadway workers don hard hats for protection from object-generated impacts caused by flying and falling objects, but for contractors, warehouse workers, airline workers, mechanics, and those working in a less hazardous environment, bump caps are

Anti-Fog Glasses

Anti-Fog Glasses

Safety glasses are critical for preventing lifelong damage caused by impact, protecting the user’s eyes from flying objects, dust, metal slivers and other environmental dangers. Even minor scrapes or scratches caused by small particles have the potential to cause permanent vision problems or corneal erosions. Did you know that the majority of on-the-job eye injuries could

MUTCD

MUTCD

The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices known as MUTCD specifies the rules and regulations on how traffic signs, road surface markings, and signals are designed and implemented. The regulations are determined by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), but the individual state and local highway agencies are the ones that select, install, and operate the approved traffic

MSDS

MSDS

MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets) is the old term for SDS (Safety Data Sheets) and were a vital part of complying with OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). In 2012, the HCS was updated to align with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS), a universal standard, and MSDS simply became SDS. MSDSs

ALARP

ALARP

ALARP is an acronym for “as low as reasonably practicable.” It is similar to SFAIRP, “so far as is reasonably practicable.” Both of these involve calculating a risk against the money, time, and effort required to control the risk. Essentially, ALARP describes the level to which risks may be expected to be controlled within the workplace.

ATSDR

ATSDR

The Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) is a federal public health agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. It protects and works hand-in-hand with communities who are impacted by exposure to hazardous substances. This exposure often leads to harmful health effects, and many communities throughout the country seek information and

Process Kaizen

Process Kaizen

Kaizen is the process of continuous improvement in the workplace and is also known as “change for the better.” It is a foundational concept to Lean manufacturing and refers to the practice of continually seeking out ways to improve work operations. Improvements may range from direct cost savings, enhanced functionality, and higher customer satisfaction. Eventually,

Scrumban

Scrumban

Scrumban is an Agile method of management that is a hybrid of Scrum and Kanban, both of which are Lean manufacturing principles. Agile methods traditionally apply to software development, and they encourage teamwork, communication, and accountability. Rather than implementing in-depth planning as a project begins, they adopt changing requirements as time goes on. Originally, Scrumban was utilized

International Fire Code (IFC)

International Fire Code (IFC)

The International Fire Code (IFC) is a globally recognized, comprehensive document within the International Code Family. It is a model code and a design document, standardizing fire safety for new and existing buildings, facilities, storage and processes and establishing minimum requirements for fire prevention and fire protection systems based on performance-related and prescriptive provisions. Some topics

WHMIS

WHMIS

WHMIS is an acronym for the Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System created by Canada in 1988, also known in French as SIMDUT “Système D’Information sur les Matières Dangereuses Utilisées au Travail.” It has changed quite a bit since 1988 as evident at its most recent update in 2015 when the classification system for Hazmat materials was aligned

Anchor Point

Anchor Point

An anchorage point is one of the essential components of a personal fall protection system. Fall protection anchor points are connected to lanyards or lifelines and are typically installed on a roof, either temporarily or permanently. In the case of a fall, the anchorage needs to be secure enough to keep the worker suspended from their

Hi-Vis Safety Apparel (HVSA)

Hi-Vis Safety Apparel (HVSA)

Hi-Vis, or high visibility, clothing is a type of personal protective equipment designed to get the user noticed immediately. Unlike many other forms of PPE, hi-vis clothes do not act as a physical barrier between the wearer and their body. Instead, hi-vis vests, pants, coveralls, and hats are made with materials bright enough to be seen from

Asbestos Exposure

Asbestos Exposure

Asbestos is a group of six naturally occurring minerals resistant to heat and corrosion. It is one of the most widely recognizable health hazards and exposure to asbestos can result in temporary or permanent disability, cancer, or death. However, asbestos minerals have been used in for decades in commercial products, household products, fireproofing material, car brakes, and

Assembly Line

Assembly Line

An assembly line is a manufacturing tool that was first widely used by Henry Ford to manufacture his automobiles. It involves a sequence of workers and machines in a factory that progressively assembles a series of identical items. The principle behind the assembly line is that each worker completes a single, specific task, which they

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